Story Theory

The psychological and linguistic foundations to how stories work. 

Story Theory - the psychological and linguistic foundations to how stories work (The Story Series Book 2)

"Finally. An original approach to story telling!"

"Story Theory is a hugely insightful read for anyone who wants to take their storytelling more seriously. David succeeds where others have failed in making some pretty dry linguistic theory utterly readable - you won't find a clearer explanation of the grounding principles of how stories work.

But the real gift is that, towards the end, David provides a definition of story which is both elegant and powerful. I won't ruin what it is, but as someone who grapples with understanding and applying narrative concepts, it has been hugely illuminating. There are many books out there offering a formula for structuring a story - this is one of the only ones that goes deep enough to help you create your own formula."

(Amazon Review)

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What people say...

"The Power of Story and the Secret Life of Rabbits...

(Amazon review) 

You might, rightly, be wary of academic theory as applied to creative writing. After all how many professors have published best selling novels?

However, if there's going to be an exception then it should probably be David Baboulene's compelling thesis on why story is one of the most powerful tools for human learning.

Yes, it goes over some of the same ground covered in The Story Book but does so from a rather more learned perspective.

Well worth a read if you're interested in what makes stories tick and why they resonate with the reader. If nothing else you'll never look at a car that has crashed into a tree in quite the same way again."

 

"A recipe for writing success" 

(Amazon review)

"Of all the authors on creative writing that I have read (and I’ve lost count of the number), David Baboulene comes closest, in my view, to identifying the Holy Grail of writing – the recipe required to make the perfect story." 

This is the number one resource I have for story in general and in particular, screen writing. It's the most enlightening book of all the materials I've purchased regarding story, structure, and how to integrate subtext. David Baboulene is the only author I've read who discusses the various levels of conflict and how they can be woven seamlessly into a story. And he opens the reader's eyes on how to weave and tell a story in subtext, which is the most engaging storytelling methodology, and one of tremendous impact.

I keep this close beside me whenever I think about developing a new story. David's got some great checklists for how to make sure you get your ducks in line before starting,without resorting to populating a story structure framework "with brilliance" (per the author). Those insights alone merge the lines between "pantsers" and "plotters" when putting a story idea down, and he offers many practical ways to use common story planning methods and tools -- like index cards -- to work a story from story question to resolution.

If you only read ONE book on story, make it this one! HIGHLY recommended.

"Brilliance."

(Amazon review)

"This is the number one resource I have for story in general and in particular, screen writing. It's the most enlightening book of all the materials I've purchased regarding story, structure, and how to integrate subtext. David Baboulene is the only author I've read who discusses the various levels of conflict and how they can be woven seamlessly into a story. And he opens the reader's eyes on how to weave and tell a story in subtext, which is the most engaging storytelling methodology, and one of tremendous impact.

I keep this close beside me whenever I think about developing a new story. David's got some great checklists for how to make sure you get your ducks in line before starting. Those insights alone merge the lines between "pantsers" and "plotters" when putting a story idea down, and he offers many practical ways to use common story planning methods and tools -- like index cards -- to work a story from story question to resolution.

If you only read ONE book on story, make it this one! HIGHLY recommended."

 

"There was a rabbit and an oncoming car..."

(Amazon review)

For years I've been hearing other writers and reviewers talk about subtext and how great it is. But I wasn't able to find any books that spelled out what it is and why it's important and how to include it in my own writing. David Baboulene has devoted years to studying subtext, and this little gem of a book covers the topic from its underpinnings in language to how it works on a reader. It all comes down to "knowledge gaps."

He explains that we authors don't work with subtext--we supply the knowledge gaps and subtext is the result. He provides lots of examples from contemporary stories to demonstrate how these knowledge gaps work on the reader's (viewer's) imagination and keep him or her engaged. This is what explains why I'm willing to stay up until 4 in the morning reading a book.

There are many other books that cover topics on writing craft, but a perfectly crafted narrative may still not result in a story readers will seek out in droves. This book explains that mysterious quantity X that is required to engage readers everywhere. I can't recommend this book enough."

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